What are the New Coinages for English Vocabulary during Covid-19 pandemic ?

The Covid-19 or the Corona Virus Pandemic has affected the whole World. The Latin word ‘corona’ means ‘crown’ and that the virus is called ‘corona’ because of its crown-like shape and spikes. In a similar way, several new words and phrases like fomite transmission, social distancing, quarantine, covidiot (someone ignoring public health advice), covidient (people who strictly follow public health guidelines), etc. have been coined and are being widely used by people today in order to define the new pandemic situations.

Covid-19 and New Coinages

It is indubitably true that the Covid-19 pandemic via Novel Coronavirus has enriched the vocabulary effusively. Covid – 19 pandemic has given birth of new coinages in the English glossary. IG Spoken English Online Institute in India has shortlisted twenty ( 20 ) important vocabulary which is aligned with the Covid-19 pandemic. Vocabulary always escalates the level of comprehension.

covid-19

All these new words have led to the creation of a whole new vocabulary and you will be surprised to know that approximately thousands of words are added to the English language each and every year.

new coinages

As interesting as it seems, it makes us wonder whether we are actually making any efforts to escalate our own vocabulary or is the English language, which has now become a critical skill to converse, articulate and disseminate working around its way much faster than we’ll ever be able to. All these new glossaries really help to all; especially to those who aspire to crack in IELTS or TOEFL examination in the ensuing time.

Whether it’s a postgraduate, MCA, engineering graduate looking for a placement, or a student or working professional looking to study and work abroad, mastery over the English language has become imperative for everyone to frame your inner ability.

1. Cluster :-

A collection of cases occurring in the same place at the same time. In the U.S. in February and March, early clusters of COVID-19 developed in California, New York, and Washington state.

2. Community Spread :

Circulation of a disease among people in a certain area with no clear explanation of how they were infected—they did not travel to an affected area and had no close link to another confirmed case.

This is sometimes referred to as community transmission. In late February, a woman in California became the first patient confirmed in the U.S. who could not confirm how she got COVID-19.

3. Transmission :-

Although scientists are still learning about COVID-19 as more data becomes available, the virus is thought to be spread mainly from person-to-person contact, as well as when a person touches a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touches the mouth, nose, or possibly eyes. What follows are some keywords used in news outlets to discuss the transmission of COVID-19.

4. Fomite Transmission :-

Fomite transmission refers to the transmission of infectious diseases by objects. More specifically, it refers to the transmission of infectious diseases by germs left on objects.

One common example of this is how the cold virus can be spread by people sneezing and touching door handles. Another is how food can become contaminated on uncleaned cutting boards. Respiratory secretions or droplets expelled by infected individuals can contaminate surfaces and objects, creating fomites (contaminated surfaces).

Viable SARS-CoV-2 virus and/or RNA detected by RT-PCR can be found on those surfaces for periods ranging from hours to days, depending on the ambient environment (including temperature and humidity) and the type of surface, in particular at high concentration in health care facilities where COVID-19 patients are treated.

5. Incubation Period :-

The time between when a person is infected by a virus and when he or she notices symptoms of the disease. Estimates of the incubation period for COVID-19 range from 2-14 days, but doctors and researchers may adjust that as more data becomes available.

6. Droplet Transmission :-

A form of direct transmission, this is a spray containing large, short-range aerosols (tiny particles suspended in air) produced by sneezing, coughing, or talking.

Droplet transmission occurs—in general, and for COVID-19—when a person is in close contact with someone who has respiratory symptoms.

7. Asymptomatic :-

When a patient is a carrier of an illness but does not show symptoms. People are thought to be most contagious for COVID-19 when they are most symptomatic, according to the CDC, although researchers are still investigating how its spread might be possible at other times, including during the incubation period (called “pre-symptomatic transmission”) and even after symptoms have resolved.

Man feeling ill as he walks through a crowd

8. Super Spreader :-

One person who, for unknown reasons, can infect an unusually large number of people. Infectious disease specialists say it is common for super-spreaders to play a large role in the transmission of viruses. It is also said that children are the most asymptomatic superspreaders who carry the virus quite more than an adult.

In what’s known as the 80/20 rule, 20% of infected patients may drive 80% of transmissions.

9. Hand Hygiene :-

A key strategy for slowing the spread for COVID-19. Washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is one of the most important steps to take to protect against COVID-19 and many other diseases. You have to use antimicrobial hand sanitizer to prevent the virus.

10. Self Distancing :-

Putting physical distance between yourself and other people. This means avoiding groups of people (parties, crowds on sidewalks, lines in a store) and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet) from others when possible.

11. Self Isolation :-

Basically a voluntary agreement, this means you are to remain at home and not go to work or school. You’ll be expected to limit your movements outside (you can go for a walk and go shopping, though) and monitor your health for 14 days after returning from travel to a place known to have high numbers of COVID-19 infections.

12. Self Monitoring :-

This simply means checking yourself for COVID-19 symptoms, including fever, cough, or difficulty breathing. If you notice symptoms, you should self-isolate and seek advice by telephone from a health care provider or local health department to determine whether you need a medical evaluation.

13. Isolation :-

On a larger scale, isolation involves keeping people with confirmed cases of a contagious disease separated from people who are not sick.

If you have a confirmed case of COVID-19, for example, you may be put into isolation for public health purposes—it may be voluntary or compelled by federal, state, or local public health orders.

14. Quarantine :-

Unlike isolation, quarantine involves separating and restricting the movements of people who were exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.

The government may impose a quarantine on someone who was exposed to COVID-19 to avoid the spread of the disease to others if they get sick.

15. Personal Protective Equipment ( PPE ) :-

Specialized clothing or equipment, worn by an employee for protection against infectious materials,” as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

In health care settings, PPE may include gloves, gowns, aprons, masks, respirators, goggles, and face shields.

Medical teams run simulation drills to safely intubate COVID-19 patient.

The CDC provides recommendations for when and what PPE should be used to prevent exposure to infectious diseases. Typically, and in a pre-COVID-19 world, health care workers use new PPE for each patient interaction, depending on the patient’s condition, which is why with the expected surge of COVID-19 patients, the supply of PPE in hospitals around the country is expected to run low—or out.

These shortages may leave doctors, nurses, and other caregivers ill-equipped to protect themselves while caring for COVID-19 patients.

16. N95 Respirator :-

Sometimes casually referred to as an “N95 mask,” this PPE is worn on providers’ faces, forming a tight seal around the nose and mouth. Though it looks like a surgical mask, and N95 is actually a respirator that filters out at least 95% of particles in the air.

What’s more, it requires a 20-minute “fit test” to ensure proper fitting—and it does not provide adequate protection for people with facial hair. The CDC does not recommend N95 respirators for public use.

17. Ventilator :-

This is a machine to help patients breathe when their lungs are damaged, and they can’t get enough oxygen on their own. A ventilator takes over the work of breathing for a patient to allow the damaged lungs to heal; it is not itself a treatment. As there are no FDA-approved treatments yet for COVID-19, seriously ill patients are given supportive care, including supplementary oxygen and mechanical ventilatory support

18. Patient Zero :-

Patient zero is the first person to contact the diseases relating to the outbreak named Covid – 19.

19. Zoonotic :-

The zoonotic virus is relating to diseases that are transmitted between animals and people. It is believed that the Novel Coronavirus is a zoonotic virus. It is surmised that Novel Coronavirus is originated from a bat.

20. Herd Immunity :-

When a significant proportion of the population is immune to disease either through a vaccine or by having naturally built up immunity, it is called ” Herd Immunity “.

Indrajit ganguly

About the Author

Indrajit Ganguly

Hi ! I am Indrajit Ganguly. People all across the globe know me by my professional nickname IG. I am a spoken English language trainer and Blogger. I love to write article which attracts me.

16 thoughts on “What are the New Coinages for English Vocabulary during Covid-19 pandemic ?”

  1. As human beings is of a mobile nature and we are not used with being of a static nature . Due to lockdown in the Covid -19 Pandemic time, we the human beings had to stay in homes without doing any work which slowly started to affect the mental and physical health of a person . Thanks to your article I came to know many new things and without no doubt it will somehow help to change the mental condition of the human beings.

  2. Yeah, it’s very much true that covid-19 pandemic has taken many loved one’s from us and put a very bad impact on the world but there are many other good things happened during this pandemic like – Healing of the nature, people got much more time to spend with their families and we got many new words . Thanks to you that you have presented the topic so nicely in this blog

  3. The covid19 is not completely bad. It gives you the opportunity to you know some new words like quarantine, patient zero and social distancing. And it also helps to reduce pollution.

  4. It’s true that we came to know a lot of new words during this covid pandemic regarding this Corona. So we may agree in one thing that this Corona has helped in our lexical growth. Such words like Quarantine, Social Distancing, Zoonotic etc have been came in our knowledge during this time.

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